Curriculum

Summer Chronobiology course May 26-29 in Gainesville, FL.

This course will cover a wide range of topics! Lectures will offer background on molecular basis for biological rhythms in plants, insects, mammals. Photoreceptor pathways will be compared. Students will learn how researchers are working to develop biomarkers and how to assess phase resetting. Everyone will get hands-on experience analyzing rhythmic data and creating simple mathematical models. Instruction will be provided by leading researchers in the field, with class size kept small enough for personal tutoring sessions and active learning.

Here is a DRAFT schedule:

2020 International Chronobiology Summer School

This course welcomes graduates students and postdoctoral fellows new to the field of Chronobiology.

Every student should come with a poster describing their current research. It is not necessary to show results; the poster can describe planned experiments. All teachers will also come with a poster describing their current major lines of research. Posters will be up all week, with a day assigned to each for presentation.

Day 1: Clock molecular mechanisms

Tuesday 26 May

Time Format Teacher Title
9:00 Lecture Mary Harrington What is a biological clock and how do we study it?
9:30 Lecture Stacey Harmer Molecular clocks in plants
10:20 Lecture Joanna Chiu Molecular clocks in insects
11:10 Break
11:30 Lecture John Hogenesch Molecular clocks in mammals
12:20 Discussion Carmel Martin-Fairey General discussion
13:00 Lunch
13:45 Posters Subset 1 of posters to be presented
14:30 Workshop John Hogenesch, Michelle Gumz Using the molecular clock to create biomarkers
16:30 Workshop John Hogenesch Data analysis approaches in transcriptomic studies
17:30 Study Groups Questions and discussion
18:30 End

 

Day 2:  Fundamental properties of biological rhythms and photoreceptor inputs

Wednesday 27 May

Time Format Teacher Title
9:00 Lecture The evolutionary significance of circadian phase
9:30 Lecture Horacio de la Iglesia Circadian photoreception in mammals
10:20 Lecture Luoying Zhang Circadian photoreception in insects
11:10 Break
11:30 Lecture Stacey Harmer Circadian photoreception in plants
12:20 Discussion Jaekyoung Kim General discussion
13:00 Lunch
13:45 Posters Subset 2 of posters to be presented
14:30 Workshop Mary Harrington and Tanya Leise PRC’s, actograms and data analysis: a circadian clocks survival kit
16:30 Workshop Tanya Leise Data analysis: Period and phase
17:30 Study Groups Questions and discussion
18:30 End

 

Day 3: Clock works

Thursday 28  May

Time Format Teacher Title
9:00 Lecture Erik Herzog The suprachiasmatic nucleus
9:30 Lecture Jaekyoung Kim How can modeling help to understand the clock mechanism?
10:20 Lecture Ilia Karatsoreos A clock for all seasons
11:10 Break
11:30 Lecture Horacio de la Iglesia Tidal and lunar rhythms
12:20 Discussion India Nichols General discussion
13:00 Lunch
13:45 Posters Subset 3 of posters to be presented
14:30 Workshop Tanya Leise and Jaekyoung Kim

 

Building a simple model of a biological clock
16:30 Workshop India Nichols Sleep – the Two Process Model
17:30 Study Groups Questions and discussion
18:30 End

 

Day 4: Clock outputs

Friday 29 May

Time Format Teacher Title
9:00 Lecture Horacio de la Iglesia Condor Instruments Student Sleep Lab
9:30 Lecture Karyn Esser Clock controlled genes and peripheral clocks
10:20 Lecture Luoying Zhang Circadian disruption and mental health
11:10 Break
11:30 Lecture Carmel Martin-Fairey Circadian rhythms and reproduction
12:20 Discussion Erik Herzog General discussion
13:00 Lunch
13:45 PI Posters Instructors will present posters on their current research interests
14:30 Workshop Stacey Harmer and Joanna Chiu Mechanisms for seasonal timing across diverse organisms and the impacts of climate change

 

16:30 Workshop Hanspeter Herzel Understanding entrainment: seasonality and jetlag
17:30 Wrap up Condor Instruments Student Sleep Lab: Questions and discussion
18:30 End

 

 

Friday 29 May – Bus transfer to Amelia Island for the SRBR meeting –

Local MAP here